Monday, January 23, 2012

~ Mailbox Monday ~

Welcome to Mailbox Monday, a weekly meme originally created and hosted by Marcia of A girl and her books and hosted this month by Alyce of At Home With Books. Below are the titles I received for review, purchased, or otherwise obtained over the course of the past week. Warning: Mailbox Monday can lead to envy, toppling TBR piles and humongous wish lists! I didn’t receive any review books this week but I did receive two books I’m really looking forward to reading!
Gillespie and I by Jane Harris  (for review)
It would appear that I am to be the first to write a book on Gillespie. Who, if not me, was dealt that hand?


As she sits in her Bloomsbury home, with her two birds for company, elderly Harriet Baxter sets out to relate the story of her acquaintance, over four decades previously, with Ned Gillespie, a talented artist who never achieved the fame that she maintains he deserved.


Back in 1888, the young, art-loving Harriet arrives in Glasgow at the time of the International Exhibition. After a chance encounter, she befriends the Gillespie family and soon becomes a fixture in all of their lives. But when tragedy strikes - leading to a notorious criminal trial - the promise and certainties of this world all too rapidly disintegrate into mystery and deception.


Featuring a memorable cast of characters, infused with atmosphere and period detail, and shot through with wicked humour, Gillespie and I is a powerful and haunting second novel from one of today's most striking new voices.


Open City by Teju Cole   (for review)
Along the streets of Manhattan, a young Nigerian doctor doing his residency wanders aimlessly. The walks meet a need for Julius: they are a release from the tightly regulated mental environment of work, and they give him the opportunity to process his relationships, his recent breakup with his girlfriend, his present, his past. Though he is navigating the busy parts of town, the impression of countless faces does nothing to assuage his feelings of isolation.


But it is not only a physical landscape he covers; Julius crisscrosses social territory as well, encountering people from different cultures and classes who will provide insight on his journey—which takes him to Brussels, to the Nigeria of his youth, and into the most unrecognizable facets of his own soul.


A haunting novel about national identity, race, liberty, loss, dislocation, and surrender, Teju Cole’s Open City seethes with intelligence. Written in a clear, rhythmic voice that lingers, this book is a mature, profound work by an important new author who has much to say about our country and our world.

9 comments:

  1. Gillespie and I sounds interesting. Have a good week and happy reading!

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  2. You got a great mailbox! Happy Reading!!!

    Here is my post!

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  3. They both look good, but Open City looks especially appealing.

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  4. Both of these look rather interesting, but I am a little biased towards Open City. I hope that you enjoy them!

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  5. Looks like both sound very interesting.enjoy!

    http://tributebooksmama.blogspot.com/2012/01/mailbox-monday_23.html

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  6. I'm curious to see what the Gillespie book is like. I've been seeing it around a lot of blogs lately.

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  7. I'm intrigued by the Gillespie book especially. Can't wait for your thoughts. Happy reading!

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